Tag Archives: Organic Farming

Dr. Fogarty, a nutrition and exercise expert from the UK, talks to Spinaca on the science behind how eating a vegetable-heavy rainbow diet can help you live a longer, healthier life.

Mark Fogarty earned a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry at the University of Ulster in the United Kingdom where he has been researching, publishing and lecturing on natural nutritional intervention in the context of exercise stress for over a decade.

Spinaca Farms: You often talk about the importance of ‘The Rainbow Diet’ in maintaining health and fighting free-radicals. What is it and why is it so

Planning to plant hemp

If you read my previous posts about the emerging hemp industry after the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, you know I’ve been thinking a lot about how to break into this new crop market as an existing vegetable farm. Lately, my thoughts have been centered on how to start planting.

“Root-to-Shoot” for hemp

Whatever we grow at Spinaca, my MO is to use the whole plant for multiple applications per our Root-to-Shoot philosophy. Hemp is slightly different, though. With hemp, seeds are bred for their end result, meaning some seeds support fiber production

At the end of 2018, Congress passed a Farm Bill that differs from its predecessors in one remarkable way: it removes hemp from the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) and includes it as a viable crop “for agronomic rotational purposes and for use as a habitat for honey bees and other pollinators.” Furthermore, it opens the door for funding research studying the uses of industrial hemp as well as “emerging commercial products derived from hemp.”

So what does this have to do with me, a vegetable farmer?

In a nutshell, the Farm Bill has effectively unshackled our ability to explore

To anyone outside the fresh produce supply chain, the recent romaine lettuce E. coli scare may have felt like a routine outbreak. But anyone on the inside knows: this one was different.*

Slippery slope

First, a little context. When a product is removed from the marketplace, the FDA assigns it one of four classifications depending on its potential for bodily harm: Class I, Class II, Class III, or withdrawal, which is typically voluntary. Most folks along the supply chain have a layer of insurance for if a recall or withdrawal occurs.

But when the news broke that romaine

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